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Looking for canoeing partners

Hi there. I'm Camille, located in South Texas. I'm interested in going on the Pecos river adventure. I'm also interested in other kinds of trips. Ladies only please. Thanks

Comments

  • That’s a tall order to fill
    Is there a paddling club in your area?
    Paddlers generally want to get to know each other in person before a trip
    That way they know that you are equipped and they are compatible with you
    Is there a paddling Meet Up in your area
    ?

  • I'm just getting started . This was the first place I've found so far. Yes I'm willing to take your advice. It's a good idea. I will look locally. Thanks

  • Not a family outing. A quote from the Southwest paddler at

    http://www.southwestpaddler.com/docs/riogrande15.html

    "If you are looking for a laid back, leisurely place to paddle your canoe, kayak or raft, then the Pecos River is NOT it! The river is a remote wilderness excursion of about 66.3 miles that will test your skills as a boater and a camper. Located near the Texas-Mexico border and emptying into the Rio Grande above Langtry, where Judge Roy Bean was "The Law West of the Pecos", the river requires 4 or more days for most paddlers to complete, and at the end is nearly 15 miles of deadwater paddling into a prevailing headwind that is tough as nails. The Class I-IV rapids (depending upon water conditions - most will be in the Class II-III range most of the time) will test your skills, and if you capsize, then your swiftwater rescue training will be tested, as well. Some of the hazards must be run because portages or lining are not practical. At other hazards you MUST line or portage because to do otherwise could be injurious or fatal."

  • @Camille said:
    I'm just getting started . This was the first place I've found so far. Yes I'm willing to take your advice. It's a good idea. I will look locally. Thanks

    What I did a long time ago when I didn’t know where to look was follow cars with boats into my local shopping centers. But that was 30 years ago. Now that might be construed as stalking

  • @kayamedic said:
    What I did a long time ago when I didn’t know where to look was follow cars with boats into my local shopping centers. But that was 30 years ago. Now that might be construed as stalking

    Interesting idea. I've never followed anyone, and I've also never been followed to the best of my knowledge. I do get asked a lot of questions when putting in and taking out though. Maybe hang out at a popular put in spot on a warm summer day and see who drops by.

  • I've tried a few clubs, started a Meetup group, attended some groups in my area. Here's what I've learned:
    1. the vast majority of people interested in wilderness tripping have no skills, experience, or appreciation for wilderness itself.
    2. people into canoeing in my area are in no physical shape to portage or participate in vigorous or prolonged activity.
    3. any activity organized in such groups are primarily learning opportunities for participants, lots of families with children, and experienced paddlers would be hard pressed not to be caring for others on any multiple day trip.
    4. camping has a lot of meanings, most of which don't involve carrying anything on your back for any amount of time.

    Now, the WCA in Canada is an exception, but I've yet to find a comparable U.S. group anywhere close enough to matter.

  • for sure a certain physicality required and carrying loads on my back or portaging have become less desirable as I get older, I think the important thing is to get out, period. The 'go big or go home" mentality worked better for me in my twenties. I've gotten pretty soft but like to think I still know a thing or two. I think that different people can bring different things to the table- and you can learn to enjoy lots of different roles and types of paddling.

  • Loon Watcher
    There is a group of Far North paddlers
    It’s a loose group that gets together at Wilderness Paddlers Gathering in March in Vermont. About two hundred folks ( not all attend each year)
    And there are another 200 at Maine Canoe Symposium in June
    Again not a formal club

    My experience is that there are lots of people around that are interested in Wilderness canoeing.
    Certainly it’s a small segment of the population
    I’m also curious about how you judge a person unfit for portaging gear ; your conclusions seem to advocate stereotyping

  • edited April 8

    I agree that folks generally want to know who they are tripping with before they get out on the river. Personally, I try to be self-sufficient, flexible, helpful to others in the group, and I look for others with similar qualities. If someone needs help on the portage trail, I'm OK with that since they will probably help me out with something else (like knowing where we are and where the next campsite is). As tdaniel said, different people bring different skills to the trip. What I can't stand is folks who are lazy, and "know-it-alls" (not the folks who really do know it all, but the folks who want you to know that they know it all). I'm fortunate that there are a lot of great wilderness tripping folks around here (southern New England). I wish I could get out more than I do, but I am doing a short trip on the Upper Connecticut River (probably Canaan to Maidstone) in early May - can't wait.

  • Remember that if we love wilderness canoeing we really have a duty to pass on that legacy. Many of us did not live in the wilderness and had to learn the skills from someone ( or a bunch of someones) I was fortunate to to go college in the Adirondacks where canoeing was on the curriculum and the Outing Club active. That is where I started my learning..

  • Well, stereotypes gotta come from some where, right?

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