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womens sit on top suggestion

We just bought a nice house on a lake in MIchigan late last summer, and we want to get kayaks again. Sit on top is what we've owned in the past, and we've ruled out anything else last summer. My wife loved her Venus 9 Ocean Kayak, but we want to get something longer so that her yak stays up with my longer kayak.

We looked at the newish Venus 11 Ocean Kayak, but after looking at reviews, it had nearly unanimous consensus that it did not track very well. We also considered the Hurricane Skimmer 116 First Class because of the weight, killer seat, and good reviews, but then I came across a review outlining the kayaks weakness for cracking ( youtube) AND it was pretty convincing to stay away from them UNLESS somebody here can convince me otherwise.

So, I immediately decided to come here and see if I could get a line on something better then those 2. I don't want to break the bank, but I'm willing to look at anything if it is going to last and perform. My wife is 5'7" 150ish. We'll be doing 99% of our trips on our 100 acre lake.

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Comments

  • Very nice...
    Rather difficult to crack a Hurricane especially on a lake. There are a few posters with the skimmer I'm sure you will get info.

  • I doubt anything in that length range will be tracking great without a skeg or rudder.

  • You could check out the Eddyline Caribbean 12. Thermoform and weighs 45 pounds. Not sure where your inland lake is located, but if it's in northern Michigan, The Outfitter in Harbor Springs is an Eddyline dealer. Available with a rudder. If downstate, Bill & Paul's Sporthaus in Grand Rapids is also a dealer and does demos.

    One of my kayaks is an Eddyline Fathom LV, which I've run into rocks on Lake Michigan. No damage to the hull other than a couple of scrapes.

  • Yes, I bought much of our kayak gear at an outfitter in Harbor Springs years ago & tested some yaks out that day too. I'll be sure to visit them again. Ironically, I was thinking of that very outfitter this morning while contemplating doing some demos this spring. Thanks, I'll check out the Eddyline boats.

    @Rookie said:
    You could check out the Eddyline Caribbean 12. Thermoform and weighs 45 pounds. Not sure where your inland lake is located, but if it's in northern Michigan, The Outfitter in Harbor Springs is an Eddyline dealer. Available with a rudder. If downstate, Bill & Paul's Sporthaus in Grand Rapids is also a dealer and does demos.

    One of my kayaks is an Eddyline Fathom LV, which I've run into rocks on Lake Michigan. No damage to the hull other than a couple of scrapes.

  • @kevin2 said:
    Yes, I bought much of our kayak gear at an outfitter in Harbor Springs years ago & tested some yaks out that day too. I'll be sure to visit them again. Ironically, I was thinking of that very outfitter this morning while contemplating doing some demos this spring. Thanks, I'll check out the Eddyline boats.

    If they don't have one in stock, ask Josh to check their records for someone local who owns one. Before I purchased my Fathom, I wanted to do a test paddle. They didn't have one but found a local who did and was willing to let me try his boat. That worked out well as we just switched boats and paddled the harbor for a while.

  • just be aware that while longer tracks better it is not always faster
    Theoretical hull speed assumes the paddler has the horsepower to overcome skin friction
    This is why some models come in a shorter size range: shorter is easier for paddlers with less power to overcome skin friction
    Your wife may or not fall into that category
    Consider pack canoes too Some are ad narrow as sea kayaks and quite fast theoretically. Sone faster than yaks and some thirty pounds lighter

  • Eddyline Carribeans are stable, comfortable and moderately fast. You might, depending on how the seat feels , want to change it. If it comes with their Cloud seat , it should be fine.
    I think perfect for your lake.

  • "Tracking" is about 85% paddler and about 15% boat. It pays to learn how to paddle high angle and use your feet and legs to brace the strokes. The wave witch (see below) is the fastest short SOT I have paddled, and it has a rudder. Some people may find it very very tippy, but when tamed she would rule the pond. it would be pricey for paddling on a 100 acre lake.

    http://huntjohnsendesigns.com/

  • The RTM Disco is a great small SOT.

  • @SeaDart said:
    "Tracking" is about 85% paddler and about 15% boat. It pays to learn how to paddle high angle and use your feet and legs to brace the strokes. The wave witch (see below) is the fastest short SOT I have paddled, and it has a rudder. Some people may find it very very tippy, but when tamed she would rule the pond. it would be pricey for paddling on a 100 acre lake.

    http://huntjohnsendesigns.com/

    doesn't have to be high angle. I paddle low angle but the stroke power ends way in FRONT of me.. Carrying a long stroke invariably induces yaw.

  • edited January 14

    Have you checked out the Epic V-5 poly? You never know--someday you might want to try something beyond your pond.

  • Why limit her to women’s models?

  • There are still a few Kestrel 140 SOTs in the system, One of my favorite SOTs.

  • 2nd vote for an Epic V5. Probably one of the faster and funner short-ish SOT kayaks available, and still plenty stable and approachable for less experienced paddlers to have fun in. Its usable immediately and leaves performance headroom to grow into.

  • If you have a longer kayak, the Current Designs Ignite may be a good option. https://www.haywardoutfitters.com/product/current-designs-ignite-surfski/
    I got the opportunity to paddle a friend's on a lake once, and it was a fun and efficient kayak. Stable, light weight, 16' x 24", It's quite unlikely that you wouldn't want to borrow it a few times yourself.

  • The topic begs comments unrelated to paddling.
    Sorry; it's winter.

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