Hello, Paddler!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Peaceful coexistence

Was paddling along the edge of a small lake today in an area where I often see snappers sunning and noticed a little movement and a stick looking back at me. Not a stick. Snuck up close for pics and the snapper stayed put. Note the painted turtle happily hanging out right next to the snapper's mouth.

Comments

  • Nice photo and brave little turtle. Snappers can get huge. There's a small lake behind me on the other side of the road where the snappers winter, then in spring migrate across the road, down the bluff and into the larger lake I'm on. Fascinating to watch as they seem to be intent on heading directly east, in spite of the barriers. Took the attached photos May 29, 2018. Snapper came through the garden, worked his way along porch, bumped into my garage door (thankfully it was closed) and then finally downhill into the water. I can peacefully coexist so long as they stay out of my garage. FWIW, those hostas in the second photo haven't started to emerge yet because of our cold spring weather.

  • I didn’t realize this, but one Fall day sitting at the pond I saw movement under the Persimmon tree. When I checked it out it was a Snapper eating the persimmons. Later on talking with my herpetologist Son-in-law he said they love them and even the huge Alligator Snappers like them too.

  • For some reason, snappers eating persimmons makes me think of Marley the obnoxious lab gorging himself on ripe mangos, with predictable results.

    Which kind of persimmon, the firm one eaten like an apple, or the soft gel-like one that needs spooning?

  • Yes, sunning. The dumber turtles and tortoises around here like to sun themselves in the middle of the road. I move 'em off the road when I see 'em but I've seen quite a few road kills lately.

  • Great shots!

    I always stop to try and get the snappers across the road safely this time of year. I have seen too many young men in trucks purposely run over them. If they are of a reasonable size it is fastest to grab them to get across the road. At the size of this guy though, I don't usually try to get them up. Too easy to lose a part of a finger if I don't get the spot halfway down the shell on each side just right, and I don't have the assured strength to get the tail off the ground fast enough.

    I have seen even relative babies do the thing of migrating to another body of water. Seems to be a powerful instinct.

  • Looking for mates this time of year.

    The persimmons are the native wild ones that have fallen soft and ripe to the ground.

  • I suppose that the urge to migrate this time of year disperses siblings from one area to another helping prevent inbreeding while increasing genetic diversity.

  • Next you'll be commenting on the sex life of slugs.

  • Best of both worlds! :D

  • String...have you SEEN the videos of one kind of slug mating that supposedly has the largest organ in the animal kingdom, relative to body size, of course.

  • It's a turtle thread, not a horny slug thread. :#

    It's great to hear that others rescue turtles. Me too.

    Great pics Rookie. Turtles may not have a wide variety of skills but they do seem to be exceptionally good at the few things they do.

    I really appreciate the many encounters I've had with turtles while paddling and snappers just seem like dinosaurs. The biggest one I across was pretending to be a big rock among other big rocks. That one had hands bigger than mine. Another time I thought I saw a medium size dog swimming under water. Um, no. Have also seen them waiting behind sunken logs on the downstream side and a couple times I've seen them drifting underwater with the current but not swimming.

  • I liked to keep Stinkpot turtles in my fish aquarium. Active and interesting, and look like a miniature snapper.

  • @pikabike said:
    String...have you SEEN the videos of one kind of slug mating that supposedly has the largest organ in the animal kingdom, relative to body size, of course.

    Can't say I have. I have seen that snakes have bifurcate "organs". Don't know if they are good for a 2fer.

  • Years ago on the way back from the bomb dump we saw a snapper, big snapper, crossing the road. I attempted to catch it. But as I got in position it jumped up spun around and faced me. Game on. I grabbed it between front and rear leggs .....immediately the longest neck spun around and tried to bite me......I tilted it forward......the rear claws scratched my forearms. .....I tilted it rearward....NO the head....rearward....NO. ....

    Meanwhile the chief was laughing so much he could hardly drive.

  • @Overstreet said:
    Years ago on the way back from the bomb dump we saw a snapper, big snapper, crossing the road. I attempted to catch it. But as I got in position it jumped up spun around and faced me. Game on. I grabbed it between front and rear leggs .....immediately the longest neck spun around and tried to bite me......I tilted it forward......the rear claws scratched my forearms. .....I tilted it rearward....NO the head....rearward....NO. ....

    Meanwhile the chief was laughing so much he could hardly drive.

    That's a funny story and you are more brave than I am.

    One time I was paddling on the Huron River in Ann Arbor and came upon a big regular green painted turtle half submerged in about 2 inches of water. It was just big enough that it took two hands to pick it up. I set it in the front of the canoe and it immediately turned around, hissed and charged. My black lab jumped out of the boat instantly and I spread my legs fast to give it as much room as possible to run between my legs. That turtle got released promptly...as the dog watched from outside the boat with her ears perked up.

Sign In or Register to comment.
Message Boards Close

Hello, Paddler!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!