Hello, Paddler!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Lending a kayak...

Up until this weekend, we had 3 SOT kayaks and my CD Solstice GTS. Now the fleet has grown to include two additional "real" kayaks, a 17" Perception and a 16" Impex. I expect that these two kayaks will be used occasionally by family, friends, house visitors at the large kettle pond near our house.

I'm concerned that someone with no kayaking knowledge or experience will get in one of these kayaks, roll it and have a problem getting out. PDFs will always be worn, but they are only part of the safety equation. I don't want to be a nervous nellie, nor do I necessarily want to chaperone every use of the kayaks.

How do others handle this issue, with their boats, house guests, and local water access?

Comments

  • I loan boats but only when I'm able to be in the water with them.

  • When I lived near a lake, I kept 1-2 rec boats as loaners for newbies. Now that the water is farther away, any loaned use of my kayaks will be supervised so I don’t worry the same way.

  • edited June 12

    I don't think getting out is that much of a problem especially without a skirt unless they are really huge and stuffed into the cockpit. If that's a case put them into an SOT.

  • edited June 12

    Second what grayhawk says - getting out of a flipped boat isn't a problem. Gravity pulls them out when the boat is upside down.

    Many don't loan touring kayaks because of the challenge of getting back into them in deep water - takes some skills, experience, lessons, etc. But if the water they would use on is one they can swim to shore, then that risk is negated.

  • If I understand it correctly, someone will sometimes borrow your house including the kayaks, so you don't really know what is happening, and can't give them instructions?

    In my mind, the biggest difference between a SOT and a sea kayak is the sprayskirts. People can really get into trouble when they can't figure out how to open the sprayskirts after a capsize.

    Could you lock away the sprayskirts? Perhaps buy some additional cheap nylon sprayskirts for your "public" use and make sure that their fit (on every kayak!) is so lose that they will slide off automatically when the kayaker slips out of the kayak.

  • I would never let a person get in any of my boats unless I am right there with them in shallow water. If they are a complete newbie, I would give them a class. then if they looked like they are comfortable and I feel they are good to go I'll go with them.
    If they say they are experienced, I'll first watch them and then if they look comfortable and I am satisfied that they are I'll go with them.
    In both cases, I'll go over assisted rescue with them

  • I loaned a sit in to a fellow who was afraid of getting trapped. Some how he squeezed his 6 ft frame in the keyhole cockpit with his knees up by his chest. Kayaking is not his sport.

    Personally I have trouble staying in the cockpit during a capsize. Even with a tight skirt.

  • @grayhawk said:
    I don't think getting out is that much of a problem especially without a skirt unless they are really huge and stuffed into the cockpit. If that's a case put them into an SOT.

    Or a canoe.

  • Years ago trying boats out, the one deal was no skirt allowed. It was the insurer's requirement for the business.

    But best idea is to make the SINKs out of bounds for the guests. And the weight of the SOTs will likely limit how far they want to carry them.

  • Seems more like a water safety question than a lending a kayak question. Someone with water safety competency needs to take responsibility to supervise inexperienced people. Lots of good info available on redcross.org.

    https://www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/water-safety.html

  • I don't lend any of my canoes. Don't want to feel guilty if I turn someone loose in one, and they got injured, or worse.
    Will let anyone test paddle any canoe I own, but only with me present, and paddling with them.
    If they don't want to wear a pfd while doing a test paddle; they won't be paddling any canoe of mine.
    My boat; my rules.

    BOB

  • @Allan Olesen said:
    If I understand it correctly, someone will sometimes borrow your house including the kayaks, so you don't really know what is happening, and can't give them instructions?>

    Apologies, I should have been more clear. The house is our year-round residence. Unless one of our adult children happens to visit when we are away (unlikely), we will always be here with any house guests.

    I expect to always accompany inexperienced kayakers. However, my wife may consider this "needless worry" and say "they'll be fine." Maybe that's my biggest concern and perhaps best remedied by a conversation or two. :)

    No spray skirts will be offered to guests...the water on the pond is pretty calm.

    @TomL said:

    Seems more like a water safety question than a lending a kayak question. Someone with water safety competency needs to take responsibility to supervise inexperienced people.

    Yes, this is a better way of stating my concern. I don't have issues with people borrowing the kayaks. I'm concerned with keeping them safe when they do. I would not say that I have specific water safety competency. I haven't taken any courses, nor have I rolled my own kayak yet.

    As a mature adult with a couple of years of experience, I can probably help my friends/guests to be safe. Again, this is on a moderately sized kettle pond, with no underwater dangers (pipes, junked cars, logs, etc.). We're not talking open water or river use...

    I am open to suggestions on how to improve my own water safety competency, including specific courses I should take. (Googling...) Looks like a local company (www.capecodkayak.com) offers two -- the first, a course on self-rescue and helping others, and a second on rolling.

    Thanks!

  • For the later point, see Carl Ladd.
    https://www.ospreyseaandsurf.com

    See you on the water,
    Marshall Seddon
    The River Connection, Inc.
    9 W. Market St.
    Hyde Park, NY
    845-229-0595 main
    845-242-4731 mobile
    Main: www.the-river-connection.com
    Store: www.the-river-connection.us
    Facebook: fb.me/theriverconnection

  • @Marshall said:
    For the later point, see Carl Ladd.
    https://www.ospreyseaandsurf.com

    Thanks Marshall, looks like Carl offers some good basic skill development courses.

  • One real simple thing you can do - if you may have guests that lie to you about their competency in water - and frankly adults who have never learned to swim properly do that - invest in a few PFD's of your choosing.

  • @Celia said:
    One real simple thing you can do - if you may have guests that lie to you about their competency in water - and frankly adults who have never learned to swim properly do that - invest in a few PFD's of your choosing.

    I've got a rack of five or six PFDs. Wearing one is a given.

    The pond, by the way, is just far enough away from the house that nobody will casually take a boat out without some assistance. They will need to load a kayak on a C-Tug, and walk it 1/2 mile to the pond beach. Not likely to do it by themselves. The Perception is a bit ungainly at 17' and 62 lbs, and the Impex is hanging from the garage ceiling. :)

    We do leave the SOT kayaks at the beach, but they are locked up. No PFD? No paddle, no key...

  • @lml999 said:

    ........and walk it 1/2 mile to the pond beach. .........

    Naw I ain't going there.

  • @Overstreet said:

    @lml999 said:

    ........and walk it 1/2 mile to the pond beach. .........

    Naw I ain't going there.

    ?

Sign In or Register to comment.
Message Boards Close

Hello, Paddler!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!