Aquabound shaft vs Werner Small Shaft

I got this from Werner:

Wolf’s diagram is a good explanation. And Werner’s information is inadequate, which is why I was measuring my own. I was only concerned with how the paddles ‘feel’ in my hand, and wanted to duplicate the feel of Werner’s ‘small diameter’ shafts. So I took my measurements only in the area of grip, which are about 12’ from the centerline. I have had several Aquabound paddles in the past, but never took measurements, unfortunately. The Foxworx paddles were a big disappointment, however, because the measurements they supplied pre-order were not the ones I received.

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FWIW, I just measured my Werner “Small Shaft” CF Skagit paddle at 1.123" diameter.

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Just buy the Aqua-Bound. Best paddle $$ can buy . You wont be sorry.

Is the paddle you are interested in returnable? Just buy it and try it out.

If available at a local shop, many will let you try it out for free if you are seriously interested in buying it.

Going by measurements alone is rarely useful in the real world for such a purchase.

I’ll probably end up getting one from REI. I’ll have a year to return it.

Not Necessarily. Depends on use.

Weight wise and more importantly swing weight - Werner. (Ikleos 24 oz 652sq/cm)

Value for the money - Aquabound (Whiskey 26 oz 613 sq/cm)

Indestructibility and weight - Accent. ( I ran over mine with the car) It’s not damaged at all. (Kauai 26 oz 652 sq/cm)

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I’m not sure why Accent paddles and the less expensive Cannons (a sister company) aren’t more popular. Marketing $, I suppose. I’ve had an Accent Lanai in my quiver for a few years. It’s an excellent mid-range rec/light touring paddle, but mine is a bit long so I keep it mostly for guests. Based on my positive experience with the Lanai, I picked up an Accent Pace (foam core, low angle) at an end of season sale late last summer and like it quite a lot. The blade design is exceptionally quiet in the water, it’s nicely balanced (subjective, I know), and at just under 30 oz., it’s about as light as any non-carbon option out there (a carbon version is available too). The fixed hand grips are comfy enough (gloves aren’t needed), but I’m not sure they add much value overall. Still, when I’m going with a low angle paddle as I did this morning, I more often reach for the Accent than the Werner (Camano).

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Off the OP topic but a side bar on Cannon paddles (since they are not mentioned often): I bought a Cannon Nokomis carbon 4-piece break-down paddle some years back so I could pack it with my smallest folding kayak in airline check-able baggage. It turned out to be a surprisingly nice paddle (I had been using slim blade Werners for 15 years and GPs for 8 years and the Cannon proved an acceptable substitute for casual outings). And it had one unexpected feature. My first trip with it overseas I paddled some small twisting rivers in Yorkshire, UK where there were often narrow sections with a lot of low hanging branches or shallows with mild rapids. The paddle was already a bit long for me at 230 cm and it became awkward in the tight spots. But the two halves of the shaft sections are about 30 cm each and the way the male and female connectors are arranged I could remove one half and have a paddle around 195 cm that wasn’t getting hung up in the foliage above and below the waterline. It occurred to me that one of these would be a good choice for a family with kids since it could be used with all 4 sections by an adult and with just 3 for a kid.

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