Eddyline Equinox vs Hurricane Sojourn 146

I’m torn between the 2 on paper, but there’s nowhere for me to test them both together, so I’ll ask here for opinions. Based on what I’ve read, the Sojourn is fast and exceptionally maneuverable but doesn’t track well. The Equinox tracks well but it may not be as fast or maneuverable than the Sojourn. And the Equinox is probably stiffer than the Sojourn. Can anybody confirm anything? If it matters, my main use will be for bays that are sometime choppy (I don’t kayak oceans). So how would you compare the 2?

I would not buy any boat I could not test paddle.

I’ve paddled neither one but do own two Eddylines and a local shop sells Hurricanes. I think the Hurricane brand has more flex than EDY judging by physically examining the boats. A plus on the Equinox is the better outfitted cockpit (sliding seat and ability to remove seat back and convert to a backband) and higher quality foot braces. The Sojourn has better deck rigging, except they have handles instead of end toggles.

I don’t know why the Equinox would not be as maneuverable. Of the three kayaks I own, my Samba is the most nimble, probably because it’s the shortest. The Sojourn has a 24.61" beam, Equinox 25". Both have hard chines; Sojourn is six inches longer. Neither has a skeg or rudder.

As shiraz627 noted, you need to paddle both boats to make an informed decision. No need to test them on the same day, but you really need to get in both boats and paddle each for a while to check how each fits and if you have enough leg/foot room. As you mentioned paddling in choppy bays, you want to see how each boat handles in wind.

Good luck!

I have a Sojurn 146 and haven’t had any problems with tracking, including one nasty trip with a strong rear wind. But really, each paddler is different, you just need to paddle them. If it can’t be together, well, that’s the way it has to be.

Thanks for the replies. My problem is that none of my dealers are all that close, so I’d have to do a load of driving to test each of them, more than may be practical for me.

Funny how people can experience the same kayak differently. I’ve seen a lot of reviews complaining about the Sojourn’s tracking, but I’ve also read reviews and chatted with someone who has no problems.

You are facing the one of the same issues we had when choosing— the distance thing.

We knew that we were going to be “lily dippers” just out for an afternoon float. And then probably go home and take a nap because of the fresh air and activity,

As long as we purchased kayaks that fit our bodies and our needs for weight, safety and to a degree $$, we didn’t concern ourselves too much with who made it. Reviews helped to suggest that Eddyline fit our goals/needs.

Good purchase for our needs

@baydreamer said:
Thanks for the replies. My problem is that none of my dealers are all that close, so I’d have to do a load of driving to test each of them, more than may be practical for me.

Well, if you are intent on purchasing one that’s in stock, you’re going to have to drive to the dealer anyway to buy it. Why can’t you do a demo at that time so you can make sure it fits well? If the dealer doesn’t want to put a brand new boat in the water, then have them put it on foam noodles so you can sit in the cockpit for 20 minutes or so.

I can’t imagine any reputable dealer not allowing a potential customer to demo a new kayak before buying it.

I got to sit in a Sojourn 146 a few years back. NJ used to have an annual kayak show, so I know that I fit. The dealer that I’ll be going to does have demos. In fact, I’ll be driving to a dealer that’s 50 more miles from me because the closer one doesn’t have a place to test paddle. I believe that there’s a dealer in NJ that stocks Eddylines. REI carries them, but there’s no place to test, although I believe that they have a 30 day exchange program.

If you have the chance to visit REI and they have the Equinox in stock, at least you could check out the cockpit for fit and comfort. I’ve lots of empathy as I once drove four hours for a one-hour demo of a highly recommended kayak. Boat was too big (and heavy), so it was another four hours home empty handed.

I think REI’s return policy is one year for replacement or refund, excepting electronics.

I bought an Equinox through REI since I figured I could return it if it didn’t work for me. The only sit-in I could find in the DFW area was a Jackson Journey 14 footer and that required a 2 hour drive. Paddled okay but I didn’t want something that heavy. I’ve only paddled the Equinox on large lakes and rivers and dealt with 20mph winds gusting to 30mph. Tracking became a minor issue if I had a quartering tailwind but very minor. The ABS plastic has done well. I’ve scraped it pretty hard hitting a submerged metal fence post and had to repair the gouge dug into the plastic. I’ve also slid over unseen stumps and put some minor scrapes on the hull. The biggest issue I’ve had is keel dings due to concrete boat ramps. My launching technique has improved (I was new to this) so I’m not hitting concrete anymore when I get into the boat but I did add a keel strip for protection.

TreeA10, how well does it turn? Most people say it’s pretty maneuverable, but a couple disagree. My current ride is a Hurricane Tampico 140L which tracks well but isn’t all that maneuverable.

The Equinox is the only data point I’ve got so I can’t help with a comparison. I’ve worked through areas of reeds and beached driftwood/trees in shallow water requiring maneuvering the boat a lot and haven’t had any issues with it. Slow and patient seems to work.

@baydreamer - You’re not in New England, are you?

If you are paddling primarily open water, why are you concerned about maneuverability?
If you get a hard tracking boat, you can learn to maneuver it . If you get one that is easier to turn you are going to work harder to keep it straight.
With my first 12’ boat , The bow would shift with every stroke. I can now paddle just about any boat without that occurring.

NotThePainter, I live in Philadelphia.
string, I’ve had the same thought about maneuverability sometimes, especially since I plan to buy a second, smaller kayak for conditions where it would be an asset. I just think that the extra maneuverability would be fun. Right now I paddle a Hurricane Tampico 140L which tracks well but doesn’t turn too well. There are places I’ve taken it where maneuverability would have come in handy, like some channels in the middle of bays. I’m just glad that I’m not planning on buying anything until later in the year so I can think about all of this.

That’s funny, my other boat is a Tampico! It is the 130, not an S or an L, but just plain 130 built in 2001. The Tampico has a very round hull so it doesn’t like taking a set when you edge it. The Sojurn just sits right over and clicks into place. The Sojurn is also about an inch wider. I needed to replace it because it started hurting my back! I’m not sure why but as I aged the Tampico just didn’t fit me anymore. I’ve not sold it because it isn’t worth anything and it is good to have a guest boat around in the yard.

Plus she was my first and you don’t sell your first.

I did. My son has my second. Someone has #3 - 10?

@NotThePainter said:
That’s funny, my other boat is a Tampico! It is the 130, not an S or an L, but just plain 130 built in 2001. The Tampico has a very round hull so it doesn’t like taking a set when you edge it. The Sojourn just sits right over and clicks into place. The Sojourn is also about an inch wider. I needed to replace it because it started hurting my back! I’m not sure why but as I aged the Tampico just didn’t fit me anymore. I’ve not sold it because it isn’t worth anything and it is good to have a guest boat around in the yard.

Plus she was my first and you don’t sell your first.

My first kayak was a Wilderness Systems Pungo 100. Long gone. :smile:
I’m going to trade in my Tampico to a dealer. I don’t care if I don’t get much for it; just don’t want the hassle of trying to sell it myself.

I just traded my Sojurn yesterday. Why? It was clear that I had out grown it. I only had it for about a year and a half but on my last few trips I realized I wanted to do more than it could. Don’t get me wrong, it is a wonderful boat. But take edging for example. It is super easy to lay the boat over and do great turns. But the problem is that there is really only one spot, you are upright or you are edged at the angle where the flat part of the v hull is now horizontal. This is super easy, great to learn on, but ultimately limiting. I wanted to be able to turn more, or turn less, to just have some more control.

(Note, it didn’t make me 1.5 years to get to this skill level, I had paddled a Tampico for many years before that. In retrospect, I have no idea how I didn’t capsize the Tampico when I was just starting out.)

I haven’t checked this thread in a while. Interesting point about edging. I’m not sure I’m super concerned about that one spot. I paddle to explore, not just to paddle (no judgement). Looking forward to my purchases in the not too distant future.