I'm on a roll with aquatic mammals

This probably falls in " young men paddle fast so they can see everything; old(er) men paddle slow so they can see everything".
This morning we were on Hartwell where there are several islands near the River Forks ramps. I was feeling less like going places so decided to cruise the shoreline of the closest large island. Normally, I’d do the shortest distance path but not this morning.
There was quite a T-storm not far away and we only saw 2 bass boats as we cruised quietly. It was a balmy 80°.
Very much like the muskrat a couple of weeks ago, a beaver showed up and cruised with me . I started to talk to him but decided the silence was better.
I think it is a wonderful thing when a wild creature joins me with no fear.
I think it has a lot to do with paddle craft not being noisy and threatening.
After a too short while he doubled back and left.
I felt blessed.

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Hi, string,
I used to think that beavers would appear and cruise along with my canoe because they liked my company. But after the last few encounters I now think they’re showing up to escort me out of their territory. If I stopped or circled back, the beavers would slap their tail as a warning to “keep moving on”. As soon as I started moving again they’d cruise along until they felt I was safely out of range and then they’d disappear. :slightly_smiling_face:

Tom

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Tom, I hadn’t thought of the territorial perspective but that makes sense.
I know that mockingbirds and kingfishers will escort you past their territory on a river.

I have had beavers do that too.