kayak rack

I have a Toyata Sienna minivan with a factory rack on it. Can I simply use some non skid pads and tie downs to carry a 17 foot touring kayak or do I need to purchase a special kayak rack for transporting? Thanks, Tom

racks safer
Tom, I thought the same as you but decided to go with Malone j cradles because of thier excellent reviews, reputation, and reasonable price. They bolt right onto factory racks without having to buy additional towers and/or bars. I too paddle a 17’ boat, and when I heave that puppy onto the roof, I want something very positive up there to catch it. The Malones also keep your kayak from shifting arround as it would on padded crossbars. I also reccomend bow and stern tiedowns, they don’t take very long to rig and proviide you with a degree of peace of mind at highway speeds. Also, after I buckle my boat to the cradles, I pass the straps under the fore and aft rails on my factory rack and tie the ends off to themselves with a couple of half hitches. I would imagine that it would only take one kayak pitchpoleing down the yellow line in your rearview, to make one a believer. Also, carring kyaks on thier sides is probably the best way to avoid hull distortion from overtightening the straps. Malone is very good about matching thier clanps and bolts to your specific vehicle rack and very good at customer service. If I had it to do over again I would buy the same racks.

Chris

racks
hi …do you also have the crossbars? you’ll probably also need eithr j-bars or saddles attached to the roof rack to safely carry the kayak, otherwise the boat will slide all over. What kind of non-skid pads do you have ? just curious. even the foam blocks are better than nothing. bow /sterns line are a must.

racks
Take a look at what the factory recommends for weights on the rack. They likely won’t warranty damage to the rack if you overload it. Most factory racks are for decoration having silly low weight limits.



Friend pulled the factory rack off the roof of his new Ford Explorer, cost a pretty penny to fix it when Ford wouldn’t cover the repairs.