Pretty Pictures - Just Pretty Pictures

She sure is your adoring companion!


A simple photo of a tulip poplar and the sky.

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Rainbow River today :rainbow:



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Do you ever paddle Suwannee? I’ll be there in a few weeks

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No, I have not. It’s a bit too far for a day trip and if I’m going to paddle on a river I prefer the spring fed ones.

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Yes i know nothing of the river, doing a race there in May

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The Suwannee is a beautiful river with plenty of access and many springs.
I’ve paddled mostly near the state park where the Withlacoochee joins it.

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I have done a small portion of it. much of the upper end is limestone with some shoals depending on water level. It is a blackwater river originating in the Okefenokee Swamp Here are a few photos of the river below the Withlacoochee. We did one night and canceled the trip because of forecasted flooding. You can see how high the banks are above the river. The flooding topped the banks and was about 5 feet above where we camped that night. The river can change radically with water level.

Florida’s only WW rapids are just above the town of White Springs. There is Little Shoals and Big Shoals. Some folks portage there.

Intrastate 10 in the background

We called the trip off when it was forecasted to flood the river. this camping shelter was on pilings 10 feet above the level of the bank. You can see the tree through the screen. The water was about halfway above the bottom step we were told after the flooding.

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SC azaleas

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In case you missed this one. Deadly beauty, esp if you are a rodent.

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Nice to see color. Forecast just issued for this weekend: snow flurries. :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

88 tomorrow. Looking forward to it. Come on down.

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Is that a King snake? Or an eastern rattlesnake?

Let’s see his head :stuck_out_tongue:

It is an Eastern Diamondback.

What’s the current “dope” on those? I remember reading, long ways back (maybe late 70’s), the “scientific” spec that they could reach lengths of 12, later pared-down to 10-foot lengths. I guess that meant an actual field caught or corpse collected specimen had reached that length. Later, I thought I’d read they might reach lengths of 8 to 9 feet. I think I’ve also read somewhere where the Eastern Diamondback is our heaviest native species. I guess, that is, till Burma becomes a town in lower Florida with a high morbidity rate amongst retirees seeking errant golf balls in high rough.

My brother took the photo with his cell from as close as he dared.The head was too far away.

Their numbers are low. My son-in law had a project going on Fort Seward GA several years ago. I remember he said they had trouble even finding those they did.

My personnel experience of them began with a 7-foot snakeskin over the hunting cabin door in the southern part of Ocala National Forest. I have walked up on numerous ones in the forest back in those years and they never acted aggressive toward me. Also, would see them crossing dirt roads which meant that they were usually killed by those that saw them. They like Gopher Tortoise (endangered) borrows, as do the less common Indigo snakes (threatened) which will eat them. All three species were fairly common when I was growing up but are in danger of being lost today.

My dad’s mother had a young sister that was bit by one walking on the path to her house coming home from school back around 1900. She was walking behind two of her older sisters which walked by it first. She was knocked down but thought a wasp had stung her. They said the first two girls to pass it probably alarmed it and the third child was then struck. She died that same day. However, I have read where in many cases when they strike, they do so as a warning and don’t always release venom.

Here is a link about them being a species of concern.
An update on our Eastern Diamond-backed Rattlesnake Research (oriannesociety.org)

Here is a young one in the dunes at Daytona Beach. Some of the highest numbers can be found on barrier islands.

Gopher Tortoise an endangered species.

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Thanks for the education. After I wrote you, I Wiki-freshed my dimming cranium. The part about over one hundred toxins present in their venom made me feel a bit sad for those marsh rats and cottontails that fall to their bite. 7.4 feet, 34 lbs., that’s big enuff to say, “Whoa! Exit, stage left evennn!”

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Sad story. Dangerous country for children in those days.

Do I hear Henry Mancini playing in the background?