Treasure in pallets

Wha Ho, Pilgrims;



As a woodwoiker an’ bein’ de scrounger dat be me… recently ah’s got a hold of quite a few wooden pallets out of a dumpster. Wat a nice find - wit a little milling wit a band saw, jointer an’ then a thickness planer, ah’ got a bunch of nice oak out’ta dems pallets. Good fer little projects. (But yer gotta be careful wit nails when yer mill old lumber - ah’ use a hand held metal detector ta check or yer kin damage yer blades or worse.) Lot’sa good lumber in de trash bins, folks!



Fat Elmo

When I was a kid in western NC
I worked in a lumber yard at a furniture company. The boards that were so twisted, full of rot and foul as to have no use to us were set aside for “the pallet man.” I guess the pallet man is getting better wood these days.

He is . . . .
A company I used to work for use to get 8-10/week, and I started eying them as a woodworker. Some good boards in most of them. But they sold them back, so I never got to try anything.



FE, you be really careful, 'cause I’d hate to hear about a table saw throwing a nail at you at 100mph!

mahogany shipping container
My father salvaged the lumber from the shipping container his Kubota lawn tractor came in many years ago. It was made out of mahogany. My brother made me (among other uses) a large shadow box to show off some of my treasures. I have the 25 year old Kubota now, and we still have some of the lumber left for other projects.

Point Pleasant Beach (NJ) Boardwalk
Every few years, portions of the boardwalk would be stripped and new boards put down. My father would show up with his pickup and go through all the scrap wood. He’d bring it to his house, clean it up, store some and build something.



If I see a nice piece of scrap wood, if convenient, I’ll throw it my truck.



Andy

Shipping crates
My router table is made of wood from a Harley-Davidson shipping crate and a desk top from the garbage.

Motorcycle Mahogony
In the 70’s a Friend and I use to get a very dense mahogany like wood from Japanese motorcycle crates (we called it motorcycle mahogany).



I used two pieces of it as the crossbars on the cap of my pick up for ten years and still have them in the garage. Couldn’t thow away the wood that carried my canoes for so many years.



Dave